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Are you passionate about your career?

When I was in high school, I was told by my parents and teachers to find a career based on what I was passionate about. Choosing a career path is a lot to ask of a 17 or 18 year old, and people often stay in school for years, get multiple degrees, leave jobs to get re-educated, or drift aimlessly, never really finding what it is they can be passionate about. They ponder what their true calling in life could be, and how to turn that into the Dream Job. But for some people – me included – a job will always be just that: a job.

Another one you hear a lot is “do what you love, and the money will follow.” Which might be the case for a few very lucky people, but unfortunately probably isn’t reality for many. If your passion happens to come with a low-paying wage, irregular/odd hours, or some other major issue, you have to make a choice: do you follow your passion with whatever faults it comes with, or do you choose something that you’re lukewarm about, but will offer you the lifestyle and stability that you want?

I chose not to pursue my passion because it did not align with the lifestyle I wanted for myself, and I learned that in 2007 – just one year after graduating college. I was offered a job that was two steps away from my Ultimate Dream Job. The only thing was, I’d have to take a 35% pay cut from what I was making at the time. It also required irregular hours, and plenty of OT (so much that it would be impossible to get a part-time job in order to make up the difference in salary). I wanted the job, but I couldn’t justify it. I would have to sacrifice my other dreams – like early retirement, owning a home, and traveling regularly – just to have what I would consider The Perfect Job. Essentially, I’d have to make my job my lifestyle choice.

In the end, I turned down the job. Which actually surprised me. I always knew The Perfect Job for me wasn’t exactly going to be high paying, I just always figured I’d find a way to make it work. But when the time came to actually make that decision, I started to second guess myself. Did I want to spend my life working long hours for a low salary? How important was traveling to me, and was retiring early really a goal I wanted to achieve? With the new job, I wouldn’t be able to do any of those things, no matter how much I cut out of my budget. So all of a sudden, The Perfect Job didn’t seem so perfect anymore. It was a hard decision to make, but I had to be realistic with myself.

I realized that, above all else, I would never be satisfied with my career unless I saw potential to grow my salary as I grew as a professional. And unfortunately, that was the one thing The Perfect Job couldn’t offer. It would always be low-paying, even at the highest level. So I chose a different path.

I am not passionate about my day job. Don’t get me wrong, I like marketing a lot. I think I’m pretty good at it, and it makes me happy enough that I hope to work in this field for the rest of my career. It is the path I chose for its versatility, salary range, and creativity. It offers a little bit of everything I like, and there’s a great deal of potential upward movement as my career continues to progress. So while it’s not my Dream Job, it’s as close as I’m going to get to it, while maintaining financial stability and achieving all of my other life goals as well. And really, I can’t ask for much more than that.

Some people have found a career they are passionate about. Whether they are rich, or poor, or anything in between, they wake up every morning and are absolutely excited to go to work. I honestly think that is incredible, and a really rare thing these days. But it’s unrealistic to believe that can happen to everyone, and I think we put too much pressure on people to find a career like that. There’s nothing wrong with not being in love with your job, and you don’t have to feel passionate about everything that you do in your career to feel fulfilled. You just have to like it enough to want to do it every day.

Are you passionate about your job?

When it’s worth it to take a pay cut

In my relatively short 9 year career, I’ve taken two pay cuts. Taking less money is a hard thing to even consider (especially if you’re like me, and you’re not making a lot to begin with), but there’s so much more to a job than just the actual salary. When I eventually decided to take on less money, I factored in so many other benefits into the equation, and in the end both pay cuts seemed worth it to me.

Here are 5 reasons why I would consider taking a pay cut in the future:

When you’re changing careers

I think one of the major reasons why people consider pay cuts is when they are switching careers altogether. It’s unreasonable to expect to receive a large salary when you’re moved into a job where you have little (or no) experience.

And in some cases, changing industries and location could come with a permanent pay cut. Bigger cities could come with bigger salaries, and different industries just might not have the funds to pay top dollar for the position you’re looking for. For example, when I moved from a government job to a non-profit job, I accepted a 20% pay cut. That might be a bit drastic for some people, but I knew it was the right path for me to take.

When you start your own business (freelancing)

Self-employment is a dream many people have. But with that dream comes a lot of risk, and that could include taking a pay cut while you get yourself established, as well as having to hustle harder to get work. I know a few freelancers who went out on their own with just a couple of key clients. They worked part-time hours until they could establish themselves enough to bring in more work and hire employees to help with the workload.

As someone who once decided to quit their corporate job and try out freelancing full-time, I can tell you that it was a struggle at the beginning. Eventually, I was able to create a steady stream of income, and ended up making more money than at my 9-5 job, while working significantly less hours each week.

When there is more room for growth elsewhere

If your career path is stalled because it’s a small company, and there’s no room for a promotion or salary growth, it’s hard to stay in one place. A short-term salary cut in exchange for better long-term potential and growth could be a great investment in your future.

When your work-life balance needs adjusting

A few years ago, I was working 60-75 hours/week at my full-time job and freelancing. It wasn’t something I knew I could do long-term, and eventually I gave up the extra hours (and the extra money) in favour of a life where I worked a normal 40-50 hours/week. I am significantly happier now that I have time to dedicate to what I really love in life – spending time with friends and family, being outdoors, and having more time to focus on myself.

And yeah, I do miss the money, but I definitely don’t miss the stress (or the lack of sleep).

When the compensation perks make up for the salary

When I accepted the job I have now (after wage negotiations) I accepted a 15% pay cut from my previous job. It was really difficult to deal with at first, and I didn’t think I would be able to take the job. But once I started to look at the compensation perks and benefits associated with the position, I actually end up coming out ahead.

Not only do I spend less time commuting (which also saves on gas), but the extended health benefits are more extensive, it’s a 37.5 hour work week compared to 40 hours, I can bank time off, I get paid out for overtime, and employees receive two bonuses each year. With just the bonuses included, and I come out way ahead.

What are other reasons you would take a salary cut for?

2015 Canadian Personal Finance Conference

I’m currently in Toronto scouting out venues for #CPFC15 (yes, it’s actually happening!!!). For those that don’t know, CPFC stands for the Canadian Personal Finance Conference, and it’s something that I co-founded with my pal Preet Banerjee back in 2011. We wanted to create an event for personal finance bloggers to get together, learn, and share ideas, and the 2012 and 2013 conferences both sold out extremely fast. Past presenters have included Rob Carrick, Dan Bortolotti, Ellen Roseman, Bruce Sellery, and Kerry Taylor. It’s the only conference of its kind in Canada, and I’m super proud to be part of it.

Preet stepped away from the event after 2013, and after a year hiatus, we are back on track and ready to make 2015 the best PF conference ever. :)

If you’ve attended before, or are interested in learning more, I’d love to get your opinion on a few ideas I have for the conference. It’d be really helpful if you could take a few minutes and fill out this survey for me!

To stay up-to-date on the latest #CPFC15 news, you can follow the hashtag on Twitter, and like our Facebook page.

Any questions? Leave a comment, I’d be happy to answer them all.

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