The Canadian Wealth Advisor newsletter - Give Me Back My Five Bucks

The Canadian Wealth Advisor newsletter

Recently I had a chance to take a look at the Canadian Wealth Advisor newsletter – an 8-page monthly newsletter published by Pat McKeough, a well-known portfolio manager, and an expert in stock picking and safe investing.

Throughout my twenties, my focus was on getting out of debt, establishing my career, traveling, and saving money. Now that I’m about to enter my thirties, I need to start educating myself on how to be a smart investor. Now, I’m not talking about trying to make a fortune… but I do want to learn how to invest my money beyond mutual funds (which is all that I have been investing in). My main concern is that I want to see my money grow, but I don’t do well with high risk.

Why subscribe to the Canadian Wealth Advisor

I really like how Pat McKeough is trusted by so many big names in the Canadian financial scene:

“McKeough has quietly emerged as one of the top investment letter editors on the continent.” —CBS MarketWatch

“Most investment newsletters fail to beat the market. But Pat McKeough is one of only four investment newsletter advisors who have made big profits for their clients over the long haul.” —The Wall Street Journal

When you subscribe to the Canadian Wealth Advisor newsletter, you will gain inside knowledge on how you can:

  • Discover the best ways to make the most of your Tax Free Savings Account, and put yourself in the best position to profit if the Conservative majority government follows through on its promise to double the TFSA contribution limit.
  • Safely generate a rising monthly income without investing in bonds with hidden risks.
  • Spot the real estate investment trusts (REITs) that can maintain — and grow — their distributions.
  • Zero in on the best exchange-traded funds (ETFs) for low-fee profits.
  • Enjoy significant returns in both bull and bear markets, with far less volatility than the overall market.
  • Invest in the conservative dividend-paying stocks that are likely to give you the most reliable combination of income and capital gains.

Your subscription to the Canadian Wealth Advisor will be delivered monthly (12x/year), and I think one of the most valuable benefits of subscribing is gaining access to all of the back issues of the newsletter.

Special deal for GMBMFB readers

I know a lot of you are in the same boat as me – wanting to learn more about investing, but can’t afford a financial advisor, and don’t have a lot of time to scour the internet to learn more information.

That’s why I’m super happy to say that Pat McKeough has offered to let you try the Canadian Wealth Advisor FREE FOR A MONTH. If you want to stay on past that one month, you will only pay $14.75 every 3 months – that’s less than $5 per newsletter, and a savings of $60 off the regular annual subscription price of $119.

If you want to check out the Canadian Wealth Advisor newsletter free for a month, click on this link to sign up! :)

About Krystal Yee

I'm a writer, personal finance blogger, and marketing professional based in Vancouver. I'm a former Toronto Star (Moneyville) columnist, author of The Beginner's Guide to Saving and Investing, and co-founder of the Canadian Personal Finance Conference. When I'm not working, you can usually find me running, playing field hockey, or plotting my next adventure.

6 comments

  1. This newsletter sounds a bit hokey to me. It sounds like stock picking aka gambling.

    “Zero in on the best exchange-traded funds (ETFs) for low-fee profits.”

    Picking and choosing ETFs is just as bad as picking and choosing individual stocks.

    “Safely generate a rising monthly income without investing in bonds with hidden risks.”

    Do you really need to generate a rising monthly income at your age yet? Right now, you’re investing for the future, for growth and appreciation. You’ll care about income when you’re retired.

    “Spot the real estate investment trusts (REITs) that can maintain — and grow — their distributions.”

    Why not just buy a REIT index fund or ETF? This is still picking and choosing.

  2. I don’t agree with Leigh. While I think these are overly-catchy (IE: trying a little hard) titles, I think too many people don’t know about ETFs, REITs and bonds to round out a portfolio.

    • I definitely agree. I think that knowing about all types of investing is important, and many people – including me – don’t know enough about the different options out there. And to be honest, I was a little skeptical of the newsletter too, but it’s been a pretty interesting subscription so far and lots of other people are subscribed as well. I’ve learned something new every time I read it, and that’s really important to me.

  3. The stock market is a Ponzi scheme ;) Make sure you pull out before everyone else does :P Sorry couldn’t resist…I hate investing…

    Good luck!

  4. @StackingCash – ouch!

    Nice promotion for Pat.

    Cheers Krystal!
    Mark

  5. Thank you so much for the wise advice! You know, I’m 25 years old but I think the earlier you will start investing your money the sooner you will become financially independent. But at the same time it’s hard to be a smart investor if you have not enough knowledge and experience. And that’s why it’s necessary to use experience of others to understand what is the best way to invest for you personally. But investing your money is always taking a risk. If you don’t risk then you don’t get anything. As far I know lots of Canadians would like to invest their savings and make it work but they don’t do that because they’re afraid of fail and losing funds.

Leave a Reply